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down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states than anywhere else. the second of, third of the pillars involves economic freedom. private property rights with legal titles and deeds, anti-free market economy. now, these may seem synonymous, but they are not. as hernando desoto pointed out, in many places of the world, there is and the symbols of a free economy at work. but there's no system of title deed to land or other property. this has
germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem
their whole war from pointe du hoc to germany where they lead patton's army. we go from there, what is next is part of a story i didn't even really know about until i started researching it. these men accomplished their secondary objective which is to set up a roadblock to cut the road that connected omaha beach and utah beach. it ran across the top of pointe du hoc. the setup and l shaped wine for the next two days, the germans counterattacked. an entire platoon from the company was taken out by the germans who were captured and broke through part of the line. only "dog company" held as part of the line and severed the road so germans couldn't reenforce from one beach to the other. this is a very close thing. one of the men that was attached to the second ranger battalion was colonel trevor for who was with number one command that fought through north africana and one of the most poignant sayings he had was i have never come so close to being either killed or captured that night. he was convinced that that was going to happen because the germans were the wind was the counterattacking. from
invaded germany in 1941 and a font back against the germans and they kept going to berlin. c-span: defines stalinism. >> guest: stalinism was a developed system as i say in it was a system of complete control. the stalinist state believed he could control everything. he could control not only politics and not only economics but it could control social life and it could control civic life. it could control sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind and no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control and all of society was. and there was a cultural aspect. the arts were under stalinist control and there was also it cult of stalin's portraits that hung everywhere. all of society was organized around his name and his image. c-span: i grew up in a small town in indiana and one of the main streets in my neighborhood was chris's street. it's not the way you pronounce it but you talk about radio causes in here. we never knew what causes was. >> guest: he was a hungarian hero of 1948, of
and at the bottom. >> germany is doing relatively well in the crisis. they are doing relatively well, and they will discover that they had some problems, but what is really amazing is to watch the conservatives in this country about germany as an icon that austerity which they really don't. but why is germany able to export so well and pay higher wages by our standards? they have a very extensive welfare state to a level that is beyond the wildest american progress is that what they have is among other things, very good technical the education. a very close collaboration between the educational system and the industry and government, the system of corporate governance that is much more like what we used to have in this country represented on the boards. all of this suggests if you really want to be able to get higher in the global economy want to move in the opposite direction from all the people say that we must you actually want a more integrated and more cohesive society. >> they have done much better in this crisis and they've grown faster in the they've been more stable. >> if y
as the other cold war from pointe du hoc all the way through germany. when the even lead to patton's army at one point. let me just go from there. what's next is a story, part of the story i didn't really know about until i started researching it. these men, men accomplish their secondary objective which is to set up a roadblock that would cut the road that connected omaha beach in utah beach. it ran across the top of pointe du hoc. they set up in an l-shaped line for the next two days, the germans counterattacked relentless. and tired platoons were taken up by the germans to they broke through party line. only dog company held in his l-shaped line. the germans had reinforcements. this was a very, very close knit type thing. one of the men that was attacked of the second ranger battalion, a girl who was the number one commander had fought in north africa, and one of the most poignant things he had was, i had never come so close being either killed or captured that my. he was convinced that that was what was going to happen. the germans will relentlessly counter attacking. from pointe du h
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89, and before that worked in the state department as assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs and 83-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and eminent involvement of these issues but and finally last but not least, ambassador matlock, known to many of us, career ambassador, he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all, since 1981, 91, excuse me. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991, a special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time, but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
germany but there is in english strain as well. the queen mother was from an english slavish scottish family. it is a mix. there is a significant german lineage. it was a problem right before world war i when the family name was very germanic and her grandfather king george five change the names of all people so they were less germanic and other names were
germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. they were looking after their only tribal interests, they were not patriotic, and in a funny way he accused the jews of everything that billy graham's and protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time and those who opposed his son's election because he was roman catholic he said you couldn't be a catholic and a true blooded american at the same time because they couldn't turn him down. is it true kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his bootblack one day was giving him advice on the marquette and supposedly kennedy had said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when they give me advice? >> it's a great story. i found no evidence. it may be true. there are some stories they found no evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify it. but kennedy didn't need it to tell him that. kennedy was really smart. and when you look back at the crash of 1929, as wh
. the imf estimateds that the u.k. next year will grow more strongly than france or germany, and our credible fiscal policy allows for supported monetary policy. and with the bank of england, we are directly addressing the problems of tight credit through the 70 billion pound funding for lending scheme. in the opr's view today, this has lowered interest rates in the real economy and will add to the level of real gdp. one area where the british economy has done much better than forecast is in creating jobs. since early 2010 the private sector has created 1.3 -- 1.2 million new jobs, 600,000 more than was predicted, and youth unemployment has been falling. instead of peaking at 8.7%, the ob russian expects the peak at 8.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proport
this crisis very well. germany, for example, is doing much better than the united states. the employment has shrunk to the last few years. basically cause the entire crisis. we began at about 5%. we went up to 10% in vietnam at eight and a half%. does not a recovery at all. the germans a doing well. they have one of the best safety nets in europe. there provision of services for other people has not been icons of their having a hard time. the other parts of europe that are doing quite nicely as scandinavia. famous for the quality and quantity of their safety. the idea that european problems because they have the sickened at requires you not to know much . the store. having said that, the crisis is very real in your, and i would urge all of you to pay attention because europe is a very, very important player in the world. in many ways the number one player. but if you take that european market together more people and more product. that is a very important part of the world economy, as important as the american states. also the place in the world that has had more violent warfare among dismem
catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over e
and finance merging, finance taking over industry, which was what pretty well happened in germany. this was never the case. the united states had a very, very broad financial ostentation . the decentered financial system and one in which financial markets therefore broaden the but not linked directly to particular industries. in their function became that of developing financial instruments which will allow finance to go into the market as individual firms and issue commercial paper to raise their money rather than getting it to wrigley from lynx to particular financiers. that led eventually to the world emulating the rest of the markets. the german banks which were so closely integrated into their industry. deutsche bank is not in distinguishable from goldman. and it explicitly said is a began to shift toward becoming an investment bank along the lines of wall street's, we would be engaging conflict of interest if we are writing ipos for firms that now we are deeply integrated with. they end up owning almost all the mortgages in black cleveland at the time of the 2000 crash. deut
miles inside time in his east germany but was still a free city protected by the western powers. in november 1958, khrushchev delivered an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin and six months, or else. this is a crisis, the greatest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the press, congress and much of the eisenhower administration this men were. we need to show resolve, it was said, to beef up our troop strength and get ready to divide the red army. meeting privately with his advisers and congressional leaders, president eisenhower said we aren't going to do that. indeed he said we're cutting our forces in germany by 50,000. is advisors and accounting were bewildered. cut our troop strength? won't that show went to this -- won't that show weakness? i was all alone. he was heavily criticized in the press. but he is seen utterly unfazed. i've now had a great capacity to take responsibility. the amazing that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day, june 1944, general eisenhower as a supreme allied commander wearing his uniform and talking to a group of paratroop
and the flash point was berlin, the former german capital, 100 miles inside east communism germany, but still a free city protected by the western powers. in 1958, there was an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin in six months or else. this was a crisis, the gravest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the prez -- the press, congress, and the administration thought if meant war. we needed resolve to beef up the troops' strength and defy the red army. meeting privately with the leaders, president eisenhower said we're not going to do that. indeed, he said, we're cutting forces in germany by 50,000 men. his advisers and the congressmen bewildered. cut the troop strength? won't that show weakness? ike was all alone and heavily criticized in the press. he seemed utterly unphased. eisenhower had a great capacity to take responsibility. he may have seen that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day in june 1944. general eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, wearing normal uniform, talking to a group of paratroopers, geared up, faces blackened, ready to jump mind german lin
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
becoming a free port of entry like britain and germany. so we look back knowing the result of all of this which of course led to the emergence of the nation states with much greater powers reached is a precarious it was for a long period of time but it's also important to recognize the slave rights in terms of the civil war it was a broad state right settlement but the only state that seceded from the union were slave states and i don't think that is significant, too. there is no way of understanding secession and state rights outside of the question. >> prisoner steve, the nitze fusion proclamation committed to put an end to all the discussion and any existing remnants of slavery? >> it didn't. it was a very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration exercising his power as commander-in-chief, it is a war measure, the abolished slavery without compensation to the owners, this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gradually because they were addressing the compensation. the property, having abolished property rights, you know, and without threat
like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is about state rights and slavery in terms of the civil war. there was a broad state right sentiment, but the only states that seceded from the union was slave states, and i don't think that's insignificant too. there's no way of understanding secession and state rights outside the slavery question. >> host: professor hahn, 1863, the emancipation proke clay mages, -- proclamation, did it put an end to any discussion and any existing remanents of slavery? >> guest: it didn't. it was a very, very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration, exercising his powers as commanders in chief, it's a war measure, abolishes slavery without compensation to owners. this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gra
be in turned in nazi germany in 1942 but feared torture and that is the purpose of the suicide pills in his case. he didn't use them, told me he flushed them down the toilet eventually. that he ordered them is deeply significant. both men later preoccupied themselves and overwhelmed anybody who would read them or listen to them with great fear is, great fears in capital letters, that the new deal and all that followed was part of the gigantic communist conspiracy, kennan said nuclear-weapons could not be developed and deployed without placing at risk the fate of the earth. the significantly i think were farmers. chambers in maryland, kenna in pennsylvania, finding physical labor associated with that profession, limited refuge that made life and especially family life possible. finally, both were great writers. even if the writing is repetitious. and the idea was compelling against time and space and as reagan was suggesting it will do that in the future. each man produce classical works that will be red as far as we can see. one of which we celebrate here today. in his review in the new cri
other countries like germany, the middle-class is in better shape. better trading against the world, companies are making money. a lot of things that we heard that were not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster than ours. there is something wrong inside the american political and economic system. that is what this book is about. >> hendricks mitt is the author. thank you for being an book tv. >> and now bailout, an inside account of how washington abandoned mainstream while rescuing longstreet. he argues that the $700 billion troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. program was mishandled. about 40 minutes. >> joining as now his kneele brodsky, a former inspector general for tart -- t.a.r.p. you saw him earlier on a panel. here's the cover of his best seller called "bailout." how did you become the inspector general? >> it is kind of a strange thing, especially for me. i was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases an
against germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. he believed they were warmongers and looking after only their own tribal interests. they were not patriotic. and a funny way, he accused the jewish of every day but billy graham and protestants accused his son a but he ran for presidency in the 1960s. he didn't believe those possible to be a jew and a true peace treaty at the same time as those who oppose to send selection, because he was roman catholic said that the late graham among them were right out there in front, said that you couldn't be a catholic in true blooded american at the same time the vatican would give the lawyers that could turn them down. >> is it true that kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced who's giving advice on the market is supposed to kennedy said on its way to his office he thought something was wrong to give me advice. >> it's a great story. i saw no evidence for it. it may be true. there's some stories i found a evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify. but kennedy was really smart. when you loo
to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is almost half of the manufacturing jobs are with small and medium sized businesses. i decided that i wanted to talk to some of these small and medium sized businesses and figure out what it was that was givenning them a comparative advantage, and one of the arguments i made in the book is our entrepreneurial culture that allo
the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer several things and the soviets make several demands and promised the material and have a hard time delivering that in the first couple years but stalin says if you give the airplanes and the other equipment we need we can stay in a war. so that is the sincere effort other people are not quite as sincere and providing that. so the second demand, what they want with the concession that they had gotten from hitler in the 1939 pact, and their main demand was for the second. they were fighting. this is the history of this period the americans and the british troops out most of the work were fighting the not provisions combined and there were fighting to hundred, so they were desperate for the united states to open a second f
in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise matÉriel and they had a hard time delivering that for a number of reasons and for a couple of years. stalin said if you give them airplanes and other equipment we need to stay in the war, the united states tries under the effort of other people who are not quite assistance air in providing that so the second man was they wanted the same territorial concessions they have gotten from hitler in 1939 pact that their main demand was for the second front. they were fighting and the history of this period, the americans and the british throughout most of the war were fighting 10 nazi divisions combined and the soviets alone were fighti
of germany from '85 to '89 and before that worked as a state department as assistant secretary of state for european and can nad yain affairs. and before that was the drecker of political military affairs in the department of state. so he along with his colleagues has a long and imminent involvement in the issues. and finally, left side but not least, ambassador mat lock known to many of us retired foreign service officer. he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all since '91. during the 35 years in the foreign service he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1978 to 1991 as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior directer for european and sowf yet affairs on the national security staff from '83 to '86. as ambassador of czech from '81 to '83. i won't go over the imminent and long career in the interest of time. i wanted to give you a brief recap for all three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox
of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe
everything they possibly could to push the united states into war against germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. he believed the jews were warmongers, they were looking after only their own tribal interests, they were not patriotic. in a funny way, he accused the jews of everything that billy graham and the protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time. and those who opposed his son's election because he was a roman catholic said that, billy graham among them, norman vincent peel right out there in front, said that you couldn't be a catholic and a true-blooded american at the same time. because the vatican was going to give you orders, and you couldn't turn them down. over here. >> is it true that kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his -- [inaudible] one day who was giving him advice on the market and supposedly kennedy has said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when a boot black can give me advice? >> yeah, it's
class. people did this. we decided that if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape doing better trading against the world. their companies are making money, and things heard that were not impossible, not possible in america, are actually happening in germany, and their wages went up five times faster than ours. there's something wrong inside the american political and economic system 689 that's what the book is about. >> who stole the american dream, thank you for being on
and the year rose own economy. we might not be in worse shape than greece but when you take germany and everybody else and put them in one community we are in worse shape than they are and we get the benefit of the doubt. we are the safe haven and people think that everything is okay because they know that we aren't going to defend because you can print money. when they realize printing is worse than defaulting because the potential for the loss is even greater then we are going to see a big spike in the interest rates and that is when we have our crisis because either the fed allows the rates to go up, and who knows how high they might have to go. let's say 10 percent in order to stop the implosion of the dollar and put an end to inflation. if we have a $20 trillion national debt when that happens that would require us to shell out $2 trillion a year of interest payments. where are we going to get that? that all of the tax. >> you mentioned the creditors. who are the creditors? especially for the united states right now. >> some are other americans who own treasury and large insura
crucial in great britain defeating nazi germany and its own little talking man. i'm also picking of the entry for kitchen. if another room contains more knives did his room kid how that happens >> george w. bush. >> he's in the buck. let me find that esteemed gentleman. is he? >> he is. >> there he is. forty-third president of the added states who received the presidency as a gift for his 504th birthday from his parents, george and barbara. >> and the state of florida. >> using his connection to the supreme court has fire was able to pull a few strings to give his son the extravagant presents witchy accepted despite his disappointment over not receiving a ford mustang that he had repeatedly requested. although he enjoyed the parade, he grew bored of the oval office , so his buddy take and of orchestra and a military invasion of afghanistan to cheer him up and given something into. he also received a second presidential term as an early christmas present not long after inheriting his father's a war. >> there are some interesting facts about tours of the bush. main a steep -- achie
in germany. but the un has had a very strong influence on less. >> po will not old enough to remember, but jimmy carter gave billions of dollars to up alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. i was of the people who had to wait in gas lines in the 1970's. >> to any of those plants still exist? i don't think it lasted more than a couple of years. secondly, are you familiar with another program where he gave money to build five different steel mills, four of went with -- board of which went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one put at a business the plan in kansas city in. >> well, jimmy carter's programs did not work then, as i mentioned, i remember waiting in the 1970's in gas lines for one or two hours to fill up with gasoline in the western d.c. area. and just as these programs did not work then and they are not working now, they're unlikely to work in the future. it is just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government promised it would not have thought of picking the apple iphone five. that is something that is expensive, but people wait i
in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940»
of this strategy used in germany, of these national manufacturing innovation hubs and i think that ising? we're -- i think that's something we're going to look to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. microphone's coming. thank you paul with every child matters. i applaud you for the comments about the need to the to have us fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary bumming. the question is where do we find more revenue? have you considered taxes on stock transfers or transactions or other innovative carbon taxes other kinds of approaches to find new revenue that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for important resources? >> well, it's going to shock many of you to know that i'm not here to make news on revenues. we are busy fighting right now to make sure we have a budget agreement that's very balanced, and i think that's part of the revenues together with smart entitlement savings. the type of balance is to ma
this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [la
of the past. for them, correcting the injustice was more important than making germany a better country. unfortunately, we see similar tendency among many revolutionary guard. they no longer have a religious base the same way the clerics have but are using terror in order to control the population, particularly they're fond of show trials. staliniist show trials. we have people who are the rulers of iran in he 1980s, who today themselves have been slaves to the system. they show up at trials, and they confess being agents for the cia , mousad, and of course no one believes. no one. not a subject iranian believes these people, who served the revolution have completely become counterrevolutionary. but the idea is to look into the hearts of the iranian public, telling them that the chosen prime minister of khomeini, if he is not -- if he has to appear on short trial, if people who were cabinet ministers in the 1980s have to an short trial. this this change which is taking place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, i wanted to move on to you, in light of what marina said about the indifference she fel
2007. but prior to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89. and before that worked in the state department assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs from 1983-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and imminent involvement in these issues. and, finally, last but not least, ambassador matlock known to many of us, career ambassador. he's been holding a series of academic posted i'm not going to list them all, since 1991. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991. as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. and i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time. but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of co
numbers of irish people and germans who are coming here because of terrible economic situations in germany. and others coming into the united states and posing a lot of problems a lot of people in the northeast, especially in terms of assimilation. a lot of those immigrants go and fight in the u.s. mexico border. the reason they do that is because they don't have opportunities economically in the united states. for the most part, they are not very good soldiers. the san patricio -- those are the deserters from the mexican war. some people think that they were irish because they carry an irish line. but the san patricio's, one can mostly say is that they were mostly catholic. one thing i did didn't talk about in the story is there is an intense tension between the catholicism of mexico and the mainstream protestant beliefs of most americans. a lot of americans actually go to mexico and think that they are going to convert catholics or regain catholicism and basically get red of the catholic thread. i was lucky enough to have a student that was a graduate student who could read german and he
situation in germany and other immigrants coming in to the united states and posing a lot of problems, in the northeast especially and assimilation. a lot of immigrants fight on the u.s./mexico war. they don't have economic opportunity. it is not very good soldiers. and the santa true ceo. they're all i ridge men because they carry an irish flag, when they look at the people, the germans too. one thing i didn't talk about is tension between catholicism of mexico and mainstream belief of most americans, a lot of americans go to mexico and convert catholics and redeemed catholicism and immigrants, he always translated german accounts, and the elephant wars a terrible idea. they think it is ridiculous. european are always able to see from the beginning the flaw with this idea, neighboring republic in order to take the territory. there's a lot more i could say about this. i have one more question. [inaudible] >> leader of mexico. >> i will send you all to see -- and not answer that. see for yourself because it is such a wonderful exhibit. thanks so much. [applause] >> visit booktv.org to
this is angela merkle chancellor of germany. chancellor marco looked taken aback when she regained her composure she said to the president on the i know you will have much to add on the debt crisis of the arizona and he looked at the german chancellor and say i say you would go about 140 give or take 5 pounds. [laughter] mia and of ballpark? jim solar merkle whole thing that she misunderstood said i believe the future of the year will dominate our discussions in the coming days. the city that has more herb bridges in any other in the world as pittsburgh. >> congratulations to pittsburg she asked? president romney thought. no. just congratulations. the prime minister of canada it joined a group and introduced himself. are you a french canadian origin? know i am not. but i am canadian the state stone said are you a french canadian origin to the guy next to him. know i am david cameron. he looked at harper then cameron that and he said brothers? cousins? uncle? no. at that point* they were joined by the prime minister of japan him and president romney were introduced. are you about 55 or 60? and my
, it is 33%, in germany, in its 29%. from april of 2014, the corporation tax rate will stand at 21%. this is the lowest rate of any major western economy. it is an advert for our country that says come here, investor, britain is open for business. [cheers] [applause] mr. speaker, we will not pass the benefits on to banks and ensure that we meet our revenue commitment. it will be increased next year. making things contribute more as part of our major reform of the banking system. we also have to be on the side of those who want to work hard. i know how difficult many families have gone the cost of living. we have had to save money. but whenever we have been able to help, we have. we have helped counsel for two years running. and we are helping them to freeze again next year. we put a cap on the rises for the next two years. so commuters are not punished for traveling to work. we are forcing energy companies to families onto the lowest part of the gas and electricity bill. and we help those. fuel is cheaper than it would've been if we started the labor crack down. [cheers] and i want
of germany or they would have use trees from maine and new england and new hampshire. it is not a tree place any more. they have cut down a lot of trees so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that you know, i'm sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- do i want to say hey look, all this happened here and just as so many things happened everyplace, but i don't want to champion probably a the chair will be thrown. i don't want to say the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, that it all happened here and i don't want to say we ignored it. we shouldn't ignore these losses of people and we should think about celebrating what we have learned. >> you make a great point in the book that one of the reasons washington isn't crashed is because -- [inaudible] >> the marblehead sailors. the people from massachusetts who understand water and you know, for instance when they cross -- >> they are routed in brooklyn. >> white plains happens this week. if you go up
an independent freeport, like the city of hamburg in what is now germany. out in the midwest, they were more closely connected to new orleans then to new england. their farm produce went right down mississippi and out to the world through new orleans. they would have been happy to break away from those strange prudish puritanical prigs in massachusetts. what about texas? texas has always wanted to be its own country and it still does. they weren't going to stay in the confederacy. what about california, which in those days before the transcontinental railroad created in 1862, before the railroad, california to the united states. people walking alongside, people sailing for weeks and months around the southern tip of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little
from germany and asked, how did she get the unemployment rate -- improve the unemployment rate that quickly? she said they immediately made a decision to whether i saw the homes in germany. that's energy efficiency rate their future but all the people back to work and from the 3% as the kinds of things you could do. >> picking people up the inconvenient truths at one point was that movie and "avatar" sometimes supposed to be that movie. do you think there's an environmental movie to change peoples minds? >> the inconvenient truth is screaming loud for a sequel because the inconvenient truth has exposed the problem, but it is not ever really told us about his dissolution. i think the next step one has to do is people are waiting for a very important project as "avatar" with a convenient truth, other films are very good because no matter how you put it, as i said in my speech, people don't care if you're breathing republican era democratic era. people just want to breathe air. but when they go to the faucet, they want to turn on the water and know that water is clean and not pack
. think about countries like china and germany. they're continuing to expand their wind industries in the renewable energy sectors. if we don't support our wind energy industry here and the wind manufacturing facilities we're effectively offshoring and exporting those jobs. our global competitors aren't hesitating. they're encouraging wind power development. and they know the longer we fail to act, literally the more wind they can steal from our sails. so enough is enough. this is an american industry. it needs to continue to be an american industry. but we risk everything, literally everything if we let the p.t.c. lapse in 18 days. so let's focus on this made in america potential. through it we can obtain energy independence. we can ensure energy security and we keep jobs in new mexico and colorado, minnesota, new york, every state in our great country. so let's not wait any longer. let's continue to build this clean energy economy right here in the united states. mr. president, let's do it today. the p.t.c. equals jobs. let's pass it as soon as possible. thank you, mr. president.
services, germany, ms. jade sexton. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. with this issue, no young person is employable for the reasons for us was reasons against why they should or shouldn't be to make you in the coming year. the first one is obviously not people vote for us to be today also vote for this issue. this shows that they feel we have a parliament and to tackle what they seek is obviously an issue. and at the least supported by statistics statistics, which show youth unemployment is high and they are great between the years 2011 and 2012, even though there has been a decrease in octavo. if the opposition pointed out, this is probably the generation of the highest rate of unemployment. this was also pointed out that the rate increase, so does the level of health. with more young people participating to gain experience in a workplace environment. the question is, do we really need to increase the level of support for unemployed young people? is there support out there for them? is that not known where to go for help is available. in my school, we do work experience. it used to b
to -- i read about them slicing trees together from north to germany to meet some transactions, or there would have used trees from maine. from new england, new hampshire. massachusetts is pretty much not a tree place anymore. if cut down a lot of trees. so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that, some sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- i want to say, hey, look. all this happened here. and just as so many things happened in every place, but i don't want to champion pro way @booktv chair will be thrown. i don't want to say that the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, and all happened here. i want to say that we ignore it because of the losses and defeats. we should not ignore them. we should think about celebrating what we learn. >> i think? a great point in the book about weather in landscape and what other reasons washington is not conscious, river because men from marble had. >> the marble head sailors. the people from mass
at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem in the united states. the problem in the whole world. but let me just, following those comments, you know, you've got a single moment. [inaudible] decided to they want more unity or less. because the euro cannot survive unless they have more sense of some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis. which means some kind of limits on fiscal policy, but one thing, but it goes on fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they kept borrowing money to build houses. so we've got to have some kind of oversight of economic policy as part of the price of being in the union. they wanted -- [inaudible] monetary union without the economic union. doesn't work. so the proposals are out there, and i think they basically want to move towards more economic union. a lot of debate, a lot of reluctance. i think they're going to do in the end but this is something you can do overnight. but the fact they're willing to look at is a
respect immensely as the new chancellor of germany, she decided because of the protest to shut down nuclear power she is a nuclear physicist, so she should know better. orie tidal wave and a long time but she gave in to the unfair mental pressure and decided to shut down the nuclear power plants and in that corner you have it causes cancer and the weasel advancing in the lower left corner before they don't want hydroelectric power in the region patagonia in the argentinian chilean border. so they are opposed to hydroelectric power and in the bottom right to have a guide is supposed to wind power and you may not be able to read this but it's classic and capitalism still blows to i'm not sure what that has to of capitalism that he made short. >> that might actually turn off. >> let's review just for a second of the progress of protesters don't want vaccines, chemicals, genetically modified crops, research and genetically modified crops, animal research, biology research and nuclear power, natural gas, wind power hydroelectric power, can someone actually believe all that still be consi
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